Phaeleh

Phaeleh

Phaeleh (pronounced Fella, for those of you not in the know) is a Bristol, UK based artist whose cinematic, orchestral sound goes against the grain of the increasingly homogenous dubstep schema and has earned him worldwide acclaim in the process. It’s perhaps not a surprise to hear that he has years of musical experience behind him, so we had an interesting chat about musical theory tips, as well as getting a worldwide fan base, his equipment, and more…

“I’ve got quite a global following which I feel quite lucky to have”

Oh Drat: Hi Phaeleh – so you’re off on tour?

Phaeleh: Yeah off tomorrow actually, a couple of weeks in New Zealand, couple of weeks in Australia…

OD: Wow… so I guess that’s just about as far from home as you can go; would you say you have a truly international following?

P: Yeah definitely; I think it’s only in the past year that my popularity in the UK’s matched some other places, I mean I was playing gigs in Lithuania, Poland, Ukraine, places like that before I was getting London bookings, for example. I’d definitely say I’ve got quite a global following which I feel quite lucky to have.

OD: It’s interesting, with dubstep being a bought and paid for ‘UK sound’ that things were happening for you outside the UK before they were on home turf… what do you think?

P: Yeah, I think it’s all been done a bit backwards, I’ve had help with things along the way but certainly initially it’s all been off my own back, there were no magazines or blogs or anything, it wasn’t until I’d had a few releases out that UK people like Electronic Explorations hosting a couple of mixes, a mix for Skream, and Chemical Records did a big promo with a big mix CD as well, which has pushed it at a faster rate. Initially though it was done off my own back and that’s what led to people around the globe picking up the tunes and I think they had that thing where they took ownership of finding the musician, you know when you’re a teenager and you find a band that no-one else likes? I think a lot of people got into it because they found the music themselves rather than a hypey blog telling them they should listen to it.

OD: I see, so because you were self managing did you look at the whole world because of the internet?

P: Erm… I never set out with a plan, I think initially my thing was just to get a few digital releases out myself and do as many gigs as possible. To start with I was paying to get to gigs, you know, there were rarely fees involved, and it’s because I knew the only way to get get anywhere was to get the name out there. I never made the plan ‘let’s go global’, you know, but I just started getting emails in 2007, 2008 sort of time from promoters in France and Lithuania saying “I’ve come across your tunes on Juno” – or something – “would you be up for playing a show?”. I think especially further afield, more east, the fans really appreciate me going to play there and so I’ve earned a bit of respect from them and they spread the word whilst it was kicking off in the UK at the same time.

OD: That’s great. So your musical background is formally classically trained, is that right?

P: Yeah it is, I mean I don’t like that term ‘classically trained’ because it makes me sound like I’ve spent my classroom years locked up in a conservatoire whilst my parents tried to make up for their own failings..! I played classical guitar, that was always my thing, but I’d play Nirvana and Metallica at home and stuff like that, I wasn’t necessarily the most devoted student! But yeah, I do have quite a musical background compared to a lot of producers who are coming up from a DJing background, I’ve come up playing funk bands, jazz bands, metal bands, you name it I’ve generally done it..!

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